The Heights airs on ABC TV at 8:30pm on Fridays and the first 16 episodes are available on iview. These are questions Sabine on “The Heights” also grapples with. “The Heights” does not shy away from these issues, and it strikes the right balance between refusing to sugarcoat the challenging realities of disability while showing how full, diverse and vital life with a disability is, and the right way for people such as teachers and families to respond, even if they are unsure at first. I'm a bit of a chronic people-pleaser, so I don't think I was ever bold enough to be as out there as Sabine. It is wonderful to be able to encourage people who may be unfamiliar with disabilities to watch the storylines and characters of shows like this, so they may be able to learn in a non-invasive, even enjoyable way. However, one reason shone out above all of these: disability representation. In-Conversation: Bridie McKim + R... Two of the stars of inclusive ABC TV drama? Filming a lead role in a TV show while you're still at drama school is a breakthrough for any young actor. How can we answer the question of why there's a lack of women in leadership roles on screen? Privacy Terms, inclusion of characters with a disability, portrayed by actors with a disability. Growing up isn’t easy, and simultaneously navigating the challenges of disability grows strength, but the price is often pain, frustration and confusion. Related:​ Why Communicating With a Mask on Can Be Hard With a Speech Disorder. I remember working on that and just going, "My god, if I can do this for the rest of my life, I will be one happy chap. We have a phenomenal crew and such an incredible ensemble cast. Related:​ Download The Mighty app to connect in real time with people who can relate to what you're going through. These are questions Sabine on “The Heights” also grapples with. She goes to mainstream school, is a talented aspiring actress and navigates the complexities of teenage life with great heart and honesty. Download The Mighty app to connect in real time with people who can relate to what you're going through. For the first time in my life, I looked at the screen and saw someone I could totally relate to. Let me pose a theoretical question: When you sit down in the evening in front of Netflix or a television channel, excited to watch one of your favorite programs, do you give any more than a passing thought to why this particular show ranks among your favorites before you grab a snack and get comfortable on the couch? And now that Sabine is really trying to figure out who she is and also get a bit of independence to her life, it's really quite confronting for Claudia. I'm an actor and I would love to act as other people with different experiences, so I also would love to be given the opportunity to play characters who aren't overtly disabled. So often with disabled characters, they are the meek and mild people in the corner that the audience is meant to feel sorry for. You know, you're a human being and of course you have a sex life. Although I have been impressed by Sabine’s storylines throughout the roughly one-and-a-half seasons of the show that have aired so far, it was the episode a week ago that not only caused me to confront my own feelings surrounding internalized ableism, but if a quick read of the show’s social media pages is any indication, it has many viewers thinking about it as well, perhaps for the very first time. Sabine’s inclusion in the show is not at all tokenistic, nor is the focus exclusively on her disability. I didn't know if anyone would ever take me seriously, or anyone would ever give me an opportunity. 2020 Mighty Proud Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Sabine (played by actress Bridie McKim), one of the show’s young characters, lives with diplegic cerebral palsy, just like me.

As people who live with disabilities, we have a so often underserved, but essential need to see ourselves reflected in more mainstream media. ", And she said, "Well, people need to take you seriously, and it's going to be hard for you to be taken seriously because there's not a lot of disabled actors. She is everything I would have loved to have been at 16. Download The Mighty app to connect in real time with people who can relate to what you're going through. inclusion of characters with a disability, portrayed by actors with a disability, 6 Lessons From Our Family Dog's Heartbreaking Death, Why Communicating With a Mask on Can Be Hard With a Speech Disorder. Diversity on screen: Sofya Gollan and Bridie McKim tackle disability, the last hurdle Sofya Gollan is deaf. Why hit romantic comedy Crazy Rich Asians has these Asian Australians crying at the movies. But I also dance because it's political', Practising pride in the face of exclusion, It's not my fault I'm obsessed with toilets, What Stella Young wanted you to know about wheelchair users, Stella, other people can love you, but only you can make you proud. To have a character that always has a good comeback and always goes out and takes life by the horns is so fun, but to do it with a disabled character is great. There is always a question of whether someone can be trusted with the “warts and all” version of our experience, of what to share with friends, and of whether we should attempt anything that has traditionally been shown as predominantly the domain of those without disabilities. So that's what I did and I graduated from NIDA (the National Institute of Dramatic Art) three months ago. She plays the character in a new soap opera, The Heights, set around the lives, scandals and romances of a housing commission and the people who work and live in the surrounding neighbourhood. A lot of people aren't exposed to disability or even people with a disability sometimes don't know other disabled people. Bridie McKim and Roz Hammond, two of our fabulous stars on # TheHeightsTV, will discuss the ups and downs of performance, representation and disability during this FREE online Q&A event on Thursday, August 27.Feel free to join in! A traditional alternative shortening is 'Biddy'. She goes to mainstream school, is a talented aspiring actress and navigates the complexities of teenage life with great heart and honesty. Although I have been impressed by Sabine’s storylines throughout the roughly one-and-a-half seasons of the show that have aired so far, it was the episode a week ago that not only caused me to confront my own feelings surrounding internalized ableism, but if a quick read of the show’s social media pages is any indication, it has many viewers thinking about it as well, perhaps for the very first time. I am long past my teenage, high school years, but I am heartened beyond words that those growing up with cerebral palsy today may watch a television show like “The Heights” and feel seen and understood in the characters and plot that plays out on the screen. Bridie, like her character Sabine, has mild cerebral palsy. The Heights premieres on ABC TV on Fridays and the first 16 episodes will are available to stream on iview. Related:​ 6 Lessons From Our Family Dog's Heartbreaking Death. I still feel very lucky to be that person, but then there definitely needs to be more roles for disabled people because, you know, almost 20 per cent of our population is disabled, and I'm pretty sure only about 4 per cent of the characters on our screens are disabled. It is wonderful to be able to encourage people who may be unfamiliar with disabilities to watch the storylines and characters of shows like this, so they may be able to learn in a non-invasive, even enjoyable way. For 21-year-old Bridie McKim, there's an added element — in her first professional acting job, Bridie was able to play one of the first characters with a disability ever given a lead role on Australian screens. Well, for starters there definitely needs to be more roles. The portrayal of disability in such a real way has significant potential to take some of the weight of advocacy, often unrelenting, off the shoulders of people with disabilities. They have set the bar high; there may it remain. I will recommend it to friends who also live with CP and other similar disabilities, and I will forever be grateful to Bridie, and the team behind “The Heights” for showing Australia that alongside the challenges of living with a disability, there is plenty of normality too. She goes to mainstream school, is a talented aspiring actress and navigates the complexities of teenage life with great heart and honesty.
Two of the stars of inclusive ABC TV drama The Heights will discuss the ups and downs of performance, representation and disability during this FREE online Q&A event.

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